Image of divergent paths.

A common pitfall I’ve observed over the years with design practice is excessive focus on “main” flows. Scenario development, journey mapping, concepting, and prototyping by their nature revolve around a main expected path. …


There’s a new tool in town. It has been the subject of a lot of hype in the productivity space, some of it warranted, some of it not. It’s a power tool and, admittedly, not immediately intuitive. …


It was the early stages of a new design project, and I was working on a task flow diagram when a colleague asked me about it. “You’re doing that now? I normally wait until the end of the project.”

I understood what he was saying: he would do the design…


As UX designers, we are fundamentally engaged in helping users perform tasks. As such, we spent much time designing from the task perspective — understanding how tasks are currently performed and crafting ways tasks can be performed more easily and enjoyably in the future. …


In my last article (a two-part series), I outlined special considerations around journey mapping for the enterprise. In this article, I expand on why, for the enterprise, characterizing users in terms of roles is more useful than traditional personas. …


In Part 1 of this series, we looked at creating a current-state journey map for an enterprise experience. In this part, we’ll look at creating a future-state map.

This article assumes that you’ve first created a current-state map, though that artifact isn’t strictly necessary for future-state mapping. You do want…


Journey mapping provides a concise, big-picture view of an experience that can align stakeholders around a vision for improving the experience. A journey has a start-to-finish flow — traditionally a consumer making a purchase decision, as shown in the example below.

The Norman-Nielson Group provides a simplified example of a customer journey map — in this case, the journey of “Jumping Jamie” who needs to switch to a different mobile plan.

Journey maps can also depict enterprise experiences, though consumer…


As someone entering their 20th year of design consulting, I’ve had the chance to work across a wide span of projects: from simple consumer apps to large, complex enterprise systems. My heart, however, resides with those sometimes-pesky, always-interesting enterprise applications. …


As a user experience designer, it can feel as though I am waging an on-going, never-ending battle against complexity, especially when working on enterprise systems.

A popular route to simplify an experience is to implement a design system. A number of full-fledged design systems are accessible on the web, and…

Heidi Adkisson

Principal UX Designer & Partner at Blink UX • iPad enthusiast • GTD practitioner • Crafting better enterprise experiences since 1988

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